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Explore Hong Kong’s Hidden Shopping Areas

Hong Kong’s shopping scene used to be dominated by huge shopping malls - all seemingly filled with the same international brands. But things have changed a lot in the city and small boutique shopping areas are popping up. Here are three shopping areas in Hong Kong we like to visit to find something a little bit different. And when you want a break from shopping, we’ve included some places to grab some food, coffee or drinks nearby.

Gough Street

Nestled just behind the busy Queens Road Central is Gough Street, a trendy shopping area filled mainly with independent boutiques selling things you won’t find on the high street.

Gough Street

Browse through designer accessories and lifestyles goods at the WOAW store, which also has an Elephant Grounds outlet serving good coffee inside if you need some extra energy.

Elephant Grounds

Nearby Homeless is packed full of unique homeware and gifts, or check out Rare by Oulton which showcases vintage furniture and antiques handpicked by Timothy Oulton.

For something a bit more contemporary and artistic, head around the corner to Usagi, a “lifestyle gallery” which features Japanese products and art pieces side-by-side.

Where to eat & drink near Gough Street

If you’re looking for something casual and willing to queue, you can’t go wrong with Kau Kee’s famous beef brisket noodle soup. It’s fatty, meaty, and so delicious.

Kau Kee

For something a little more refined, book a table at The Chairman where farm-to-table meets Cantonese food. With the quality of food you get here (it has a Michelin star), their set lunch is a bargain.

The Chairman

For a relaxing cocktail after a day of shopping, duck into the trendy NEO Cocktail Club. Retro cool interiors, laid back vibe, and most importantly, strong drinks.

Neo Cocktail Club

See more places to eat and drink in Central & Sheung Wan

Star Street

Wan Chai was known for its sleazy nightlife, but over the last decade the area has undergone a transformation. The Starstreet Precinct, comprising of Star Street and surrounding Sun, Moon and St Francis Streets, used to be a working-class residential enclave. It’s now a trendy area filled with designer boutiques and hipster hangouts. You know an area has made it when the Monocle shop is located here.

Star Street

Kapok now has outlets in Singapore and Japan, but it all started in Wan Chai. They actually have two shops in the Starstreet area, the original on St Francis Street which focuses on fashion, and a newer lifestyle store on Sun Street which also houses a cafe and gallery.

Where to eat & drink near Star Street

Ted’s Lookout is a New York-style cocktail bar serving burgers, tacos and other bar snacks. They have an outdoor area with a green wall that’s popular with locals for chilling out.

Refuel with some of the best burgers in Hong Kong at The Butcher’s Club. The Wu Tang Style burger with sriracha, kewpie mayo and kimchi on their “secret menu” is incredible.

Butchers Club Burgers

There are also a handful of trendy restaurants and bars on the nearby Ship Street to choose from. Ham & Sherry, a rustic sherry and tapas bar, and 22 Ships, a more modern tapas restaurant with Asian influences, are both good options by British chef Jason Atherton.

22 Ships

See more places to eat and drink in Wan Chai & Causeway Bay

K11 Mall

Ok, so we’ll admit we are sort of contradicting ourselves here because K11 is actually a mall. But in our defence, there’s a little more going on here than some other malls in the area. Self-described as an “art mall”, K11 displays local artwork inside, hosts regional musical acts in the piazza, and occasionally organizes events to showcase up-and-coming designers.

K11

The K11 Design Store is our go-to shop for one-of-a-kind gifts and interesting souvenirs. It’s actually made up of many little stores inside featuring original collections selected from Hong Kong and around the region, so you’ll always find something you like.

Where to eat & drink near K11 Mall

Opposite the K11 mall, N1 Coffee & Co serves probably the best coffee in Tsim Sha Tsui. It’s a quiet little cafe that’s perfect for relaxing and getting away from the touts on Nathan Road.

N1 Coffee

For food you can’t go past the legendary Din Tai Fung. They’re famous for their xiao long bao. These are little soup dumplings filled with minced pork and delicious broth, hand rolled and steamed to order. There are two branches within walking distance; one on Canton Rd and one inside the Mira Mall.

Din Tai Fung

After a day of shopping, you’ll probably want to treat yourself to a cold drink and a nice meal. Nanhai No. 1 on the 30th floor of the nearby iSquare offers both, with the restaurant serving delicious Chinese food and the adjoining Eye Bar offering sweeping views of the harbour.

See more places to eat and drink in Tsim Sha Tsui & Jordan

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